Teen Fashion Trends

How does social media affect students' go-to style?

Photo from whowhatwear.com. This photo is from “Clueless,” a popular movie from the nineties, showcasing teen’s style during this time. Plaid skirts, corduroy, and mini dresses have now resurfaced in teen’s wardrobes.

Photo from whowhatwear.com. This photo is from “Clueless,” a popular movie from the nineties, showcasing teen’s style during this time. Plaid skirts, corduroy, and mini dresses have now resurfaced in teen’s wardrobes.

Emma Montalbano, Staff Writer

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As time passes, styles evolve, trends come and go, and peoples’ clothing preferences change. With this being said, teenagers are faced with the decision of choosing their go-to style. Whether that style is edgy, girly, sporty, retro, or artsy, it helps teens express their personalities.

While trying to find their style, teenagers look to their role models and figures of the past to find inspiration. Trends that were popular when teens’ parents were teenagers in the eighties and nineties are now becoming popular again. Becky Laurence, a freshman at San Diego State University, thinks that her style is very similar to her mother’s from the 80s. 

“My style is very much like my mom’s style when she was my age and in school, because I just really like that style,” Laurence said. 

Hannah Lalonde, a sophomore at Woodside High School, explains where she finds her style inspiration from. 

“I find style inspiration from other people and also from my parents, because my dad used to model, so he has a great sense of fashion,” Lalonde said. 

Additionally, many teenagers find inspiration for their style from social media influencers. Social media platforms allow people to browse what their friends, other teens, and even celebrities are wearing, and trends can catch on quickly.

“I think fashion trends are more worldwide wide now because of social media,” Laurence said. “Teens from all countries can see what teens from other places are wearing, so trends are spread faster.” 

Image from startribune.com. Many people find style inspiration from social media platforms, such as Instagram.

Despite the benefits of social media for the spread of trends, social media also has its drawbacks when it comes to fashion. Teenagers feel pressured to uphold the standards that social media imposes on them. Ella Fraser, Woodside sophomore, shares why she thinks social media also has a negative effect. 

“I feel like some people see social media as a competition, like who wore it best, et cetera,” Fraser said. “This sometimes creates tension because girls will judge what other girls are wearing.”

The need to fit in, or even the need to be unique, can sometimes cause a teen immense stress. Laurence expresses why she believes people feel the need to branch out and be unique.

“I think people feel the need to be different because in today’s society being different is viewed as ‘edgy’ or ‘cool,’ so by everyone trying to be different, they are creating a new norm of being ‘unique,’” Laurence said.

Although social media can increase the pressure for teens to find the “perfect” outfit or define their style, some people, like Laurence, find confidence in their outfits.

“If I feel good on the outside through my outfit, then I am more confident about everything I am doing throughout the day,” Laurence said.

Fashion has become increasingly more prominent over the decades. According to The McKinsey Global Fashion Index, the fashion industry was predicted to grow at least 3.5 percent to 4.5 percent in 2019.  In reality, the fashion industry grew 6.16 percent in 2019.

Graph from statista.com. The fashion industry has grown 6.16 percent since 2012.

Sophomore at Woodside High School, Jessalyn Yepez, shares why she thinks fashion has become more popular over the years. 

“I think fashion is more popular now because people are now more conscious of other people’s perception of them, so people now people feel the need to dress to impress,” Yepez said.