Pink Ribbon Success

The Woodside High School Pink Ribbon Club hosted last week's football game.

Tessa Bertine, Local News Editor

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Woodside’s Pink Ribbon football game, hosted annually by Woodside’s Pink Ribbon Club, took place versus Mills High School last Friday and raised awareness for breast cancer research.

At the Pink Ribbon football game, the Pink Ribbon Club sells shirts, pink bandanas, and wristbands in order to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

“In our club, we designed and ordered t-shirts,” Elena Campell, Pink Ribbon co-president, said. “We also coordinated with leadership to help decorate.”

Aside from fundraising, the Pink Ribbon Club also encourages students to wear pink to the game.

“Most people there contributed by wearing pink,” Lena McDonough, the other Pink Ribbon co-president, mentioned. “The football team also helped by wearing pink socks and pink tape.”

The club spent the first two months of the school year preparing for the game, and although they raised 750 dollars through their fundraising, some were disappointed that Woodside’s football team lost the game.

“I was really disappointed that we lost, but at least we raised money,” Ethan Mooney, a varsity football player, said. 

In addition, despite the spirited attendees, the turnout was slightly lower than expected. The student section seemed to shrink further into the game as Woodside started to fall behind.

“The student section was much bigger at the homecoming game than the Pink Ribbon game,” Danny Sochoux, a Woodside senior who attended the game, described. “Even though I won’t be here next year, I hope the legacy [is] even stronger.”

Since all three Pink Ribbon Club leaders are seniors and have yet to find someone willing to adopt the club, it remains unknown if the Pink Ribbon game is a tradition that will continue.

“If Pink Ribbon is still around next year, a good idea would be to buy the shirts earlier to be more prepared and sell more,” Campell reflected.

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