“Pokemon Go” Interferes With Woodside Students’ Productivity

Is the trend of Pokemon Go fading?

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“Pokemon Go” Interferes With Woodside Students’ Productivity

Kianna Koeppen, Staff Writer

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Chasing Pokemon is getting in the way of students chasing their dreams.

Pokemon Go is a mobile phone game released on July 6th, 2016 that has exploded in popularity in the media, kids, and adults. Millions of players have played the mobile game nonstop all over the country during summer. This is conflicting with school, which takes up 6-7 hours of a student’s day on average.

“I was the person that was making fun of players and couldn’t understand why people played,” store owner Brian Chiala said. “It actually has driven some business into my store.”

Many Woodside students have been obsessed with the game over the summer and want to play it over the school year.  For others, education remains their first priority.

“School comes first above all else,” stated Sophomore Gena Estasi. “As much as I would love to play the game some more, I can’t.”

Since school has recently started, Pokemon Go has become a conflict to students, and some are too busy to catch a Pikachu. Some claim it is because they are striving to get good grades or are dedicating more time to their sport.

“School has kind of restricted me from the game because I feel as if though I should focus on my academics,” sophomore Danny Whiting said.  “I also like to get ahead and look ahead in my classes.”

Despite some students worrying about school and grades, some stopped playing the game because it has grown too old for them.

“School has taken up some of my time,” junior Ashton Vellequette said. “But I don’t play it all that much, so school hasn’t really impacted me. If it weren’t for school, I wouldn’t play anymore than I am now.”

Pokemon Go is a popular way to spend time, but busy schedules and commitments that come from the start of school often interfere with free time.

“I would love to play the game more,” Alice Demers stated. “But sports and education are getting in the way, and I simply don’t have time to enjoy the game.”

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